Call for submission - CDS 2015

Call for Submissions

(Workshops, Paper/Program Presentations, Panel Sessions & Posters)
2015 Annual Meeting of the Community Development Society
Hilton Lexington Downtown Hotel
Lexington, Kentucky– July19-22, 2015
Deadline: January 31, 2015, 11:59p.m. (Central Standard Time)

Creativity and Culture: Community Development Approaches for Strengthening Health, Environment, Economic Vibrancy, Social Justice and Democracy

Community activists and developers are integrating the arts and culture into building vibrant communities. Increasingly, groups and organizations are leveraging the arts and imagination to engage citizens in community development. In doing so, they create places and organizations that support economic diversity and strengthen the aesthetics of communities. There is a growing awareness that the arts can serve as a vehicle to bring people together. There is interest in making places more intentionally open for diverse economic opportunities and fostering connections across cultures which makes communities more vibrant and welcoming.

Culture is also gaining more attention in community development as society becomes more diverse through demographic shifts including greater concentrations of the elderly, immigrants, ethnic diversity, and counter-culture movements. As a result, it could be argued that there isn’t a single public but multiple publics. Community developers are challenged to be culturally aware and sensitive as they weave these multiple publics together into a community of shared vision, interests and investment.

The 2015 Community Development Society conference offers a platform for dialogue about community development with an emphasis on the roles of creativity and culture in framing community issues and responses. We invite you to join us July 19-22, 2015 in Lexington, Kentucky in the heart of the world’s most avid horse culture, to share your research and learning about how the arts and creative expression are strengthening the bonds of communities around the world.

This venue provides opportunities for spirited and lively exchanges about community development practice, learning, and scholarship. Won’t you join us?

Who Should Submit a Proposal?

Anyone who has engaged in community development work, especially work related to the conference theme, is encouraged to submit a proposal.
It is the goal of the Program Committee to formulate a balanced mixture of accepted submissions with pre-selected speakers, mobile learning workshops, our annual banquet, business meeting, off-site hosted events, and other networking opportunities. Every consideration will be given to creating an event from which all participants will substantially benefit.

How to Complete Your Submission:

Beginning Thursday, November 20, submissions will be accepted at:
http://comm-dev.org/about-us/2015-conference/call-for-abstracts

The following instructions provide you with a step-by-step process for submitting an abstract for the 2015 annual meeting:

STEP 1: Complete Contact Information

Please provide the following information: (a) date of your submission; (b) your name; (c) organizational affiliation; (d) email address;(e) complete mailing address (include specific department or bureau, if applicable); (f) telephone and fax numbers; and (g) name/email of your additional presenter(s).

STEP 2: Enter the Title of Your Proposed Presentation

STEP 3: Specify the Topic from the List that Most Closely Reflects the Nature of Your Submission.

Conference organizers will be reviewing submissions based on two areas: conference sub-themes and Community Development Society tracks. Please select a conference sub-theme (such as health, environment, social justice, and so on) and a CDS track (such as general community development, planning and evaluation, community development education,and so on).

Submissions relating to any of the sub-themes and CDS tracks on this list will be reviewed. A description of each sub-theme and CDS track can be found at the end of this document.

NOTE: These conference sub-themes and CDS tracks are designed to help the Program Committee determine the breadth of submissions being considered for the 2015 meeting. Please note that the final session themes and tracks that appear in the conference program may differ from those listed.

STEP 4: Indicate the Format of Your Presentation.

You have SEVEN PRESENTATION OPTIONS from which to choose. Below are the formats you can choose and the amount time associated with each format:

NOTE: The time and locations specified below are intended to serve as general guidelines. Please note that they maybe subject to change in the event that submissions that are approved for presentation at the 2015 meeting exceed expectation:

30 Minute Sessions (20 minute presentation, 10 minutes discussion)

Research Paper: Showcasing community development theory, methodological advances, or applied studies

-- or --

Practice/Outreach Program: Highlighting an innovative project/program you have implemented that is having a positive impact on people, communities, and/or regions

60 Minute Sessions (Allow at least 10 minutes for discussion)

Small Panel Session: Organizing 3-5 individuals with a diversity of perspectives on a topic of importance and relevance to the community development field

-- or --

Innovation Session: Propose an entirely “out-of-the-box” innovative session that connects with the Creativity and Culture theme of the conference while demonstrating the CDS Principles of Good Practice

90 Minute Sessions (Allow at least 15 minutes for discussion)

Workshop: An in-depth, interactive session sharing an innovative program or project that CDS members might be able to readily adopt in their own communities

-- or –

Large Panel Session: Organizing at least 4 individuals with a diversity of perspectives on a topic of importance and relevance to the community development field

Poster: Displaying your research practice efforts through the use of a poster (will be showcase data special time during the meeting)

STEP 5: Select up to Three Acceptable Format Options for Your Proposed Presentation:

Since it will be unlikely that we can accommodate all requests for the various types of presentation formats, you are urged to provide upto three acceptable options for your presentation. For example, if your first choice is to do a workshop but we are unable to accommodate your request, give us your second choice in terms of the format for your presentation. Likewise, if a third choice is acceptable, please provide that as well. For example, would you be willing to present in a Practice/Outreach session as a second choice or in a Poster Session as a third choice? Just let us know your top three preferences (in priority order) in terms of the format for your presentation.

STEP 6: Provide an Abstract of Your Proposed Presentation (300 word limit)

STEP 7: Prepare a shorter, 50-word Summary of Your Proposed Presentation

(for display in conference program, if accepted).

STEP 8: Indicate if You Will Need any Audio-Visual Equipment.

Please tell us what specific equipment you will need. NOTE: Overhead projectors, LCD projectors (for PowerPoint presentations) and audio equipment will be available for your use. However, you must bring your own laptop for your presentation or make plans with another person in your session to use his/her laptop.

STEP 9: Provide an electronic copy of your abstract.

STEP 10: Does Your Submission Embrace the CDS Principles of Good Practice?

Your work should embrace the Community Development Society’s Principles of Good Practice. Please review these principles highlighted at the end of this document. Place a checkmark in the“YES” box if you agree that your submission is consistent with these principles. These principles can be found at the end of this document.

STEP 11: Explain How Your Submission Relates to the Creativity and Culture Conference Theme

Deadline Date:
All proposals must be submitted using the CDS online submission system by 11:59 p.m., SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 (Central Standard Time).

A Special Note to Our International Association for Community Development Colleagues and Other International Participants:

We welcome our IACD and other international colleagues to take part in the 2015 CDS Conference. Named in the top 50 places to visit in a lifetime by National Geographic Traveler, Lexington, Kentucky will provide an enriching experience for you while you are in the United States.

We urge you to submit well-developed abstract proposals to be part of this great event. Due to the additional time needed by many of our international conference participants to arrange for travel to the United States for the July 2015 conference, we are providing a limited opportunity for you to submit your conference abstract and receive an earlier confirmation regarding the acceptance of your presentation. While the official date for general abstract acceptance notification will be in March 2015, we are setting aside a limited number of slots for early notification for international submissions. Thus, if you submit your conference presentation proposal by December 15, 2014, we will notify you of your proposal acceptance/non-acceptance by Thursday, January 15, 2015. If you are notified that your abstract is accepted as a presentation for the 2015 CDS conference, you will receive a registration form with your acceptance email so that you may register early. Please note: All international colleagues are welcome to submit abstracts during the regular call for abstracts timeframe if they do not wish to submit for the early notification option.

Please note that the CDS does not have sufficient resources to help defray the travel expenses of our international attendees. However, if you’re a CDS member, you may be eligible to apply for one of the travel scholarships available for members taking part in a conference outside of their home continent.
An announcement regarding the 2015 travel scholarship application process will be released during the early part of 2015, so you are encouraged to review the guidelines once they are released to see if you might be eligible to apply. The announcement will be posted on the CDS website.
Conference Registration and Hotel Reservations:

Information on the annual registration fee and hotel rates/reservation process will be available on the CDS website soon. Please check this site for up-to-date information on the 2015 conference: www.comm-dev.org.

Questions?
Conference Program Questions:Feel free to submit any questions about the 2015 program to Gisele Hamm, CDS Vice President for Programs at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Online Submission Questions: For issues with the proposal submission process, Please contact Karen Holt at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

CDS Principles of Good Practice

We believe that adherence to the Community Development Society's Principles of Good Practice are essential to sound community development.

  • Promote active and representative participation toward enabling all community members to meaningfully influence the decisions that affect their lives.
  • Engage community members in learning about and understanding community issues, and the economic, social, environmental, political, psychological, and impacts associated with alternative courses of action.
  • Incorporate the diverse interests and cultures of the community in the community development process; and disengage from support any effort that is likely to adversely affect the disadvantaged members of a community.
  • Work actively to enhance the leadership capacity community members, leaders, and groups within the community.
  • Be open to using the full range actionstrategies to work toward the long-term sustainability and well-being of the community.

The CDS 2015 Conference Theme is:

Creativity and Culture: Community Development Approaches for Strengthening Health, Environment, Economic Vibrancy, Social Justice and Democracy

1. Please select at least one of the following conference sub-themes:

Creative Community Development Approaches for Strengthening Health
Presentations focusing on research and effective process for integrating community development and improving health.

Creative Community Development Approaches for Strengthening the Environment
Presentations focusing on research and effective process for integrating community development and improving environmental conditions.

Creative Community Development Approaches for Strengthening Economic Vibrancy
Presentations focusing on research and effective process for integrating community development and strengthening economic vibrancy.

Creative Community Development Approaches for Strengthening Social Justice
Presentations focusing on research and effective process for integrating community development and addressing social justice.

Creative Community Development Approaches for Strengthening Democracy
Presentations focusing on research and effective process for integrating community development and engaging citizens or strengthen democracy.

Creative Community Development Approaches for Strengthening Social or Cultural Well-Being
Presentations focusing on research and effective process for integrating community development and strengthening social or cultural well-being.

2. Please select one of the following CDS tracks:

General Community Development Practice and Process
Presentations focused on community development practices, processes, and theories broadly defined.

Planning and Evaluation
Presentations focused on planning and evaluation as utilized in community development processes and practices.

Community Development Education
Presentations related to teaching and education of community development theories, processes, and practices in classrooms or other educational settings.

Scholarship and Research
Presentations focused on research and scholarship related to community development.

Community Leadership
Presentations related to leaders and leadership in community settings.

Economic Development
Presentations focused on the practices, processes, and theories of community economic improvement.

Rural Community Development
Presentations focused on the practices, processes, and theories of community development in rural settings.

Youth in Community Development
Presentations about the role of youth in community development practices, processes, and theories.

International Community Development
Presentations related to community development practices, processes, and theories in international settings.

Membership and Marketing Committee 2014 Report

By Cindy Banyai

Executive Summary

This report discusses the composition of the 2014 Community Development Society (CDS) obtained from the membership roster and the most recent Membership Survey.

This information is being analyzed to better inform the CDS marketing strategy, as well as to tailor conference components (mobile workshops).

Here are the top findings:

  • Members report being a part of CDS for an average of 11.3 years. They are largely from the Midwest, but there is a sizeable international component of the membership.
  • Aside from community development specifically, members are most involved with planning and evaluation, education and training, and dealing with projects and programs.
  • Networking, knowledge sharing and learning, and the journal and publications are the most valued components of being a member of CDS.

Membership data from 2011-2014 has also been analyzed to better understand the year to year membership retention rates and to set targets for future growth in this area. The major findings are that we have a major issue with membership retention, with only 40% of members renewing consistently. The issues stem from a lack of continued value for conference-local memberships and problems with the membership renewal system.

The Membership Committee requests $6,000 in 2015 to help address some of these recommendations.


Membership Composition

Average member reports being involved with organization for 11.3 years

Where are CDS members from?

Only a few members in each state, but membership is Midwest-heavy

Top Origins of CDS Members 2012-2013

  1. Minnesota (12.5%)
  2. Kentucky (7%)
  3. Wisconsin (6.2%)
  4. Ohio (5.4%)
  5. Missouri (5.4%)
  6. Illinois (4.7%)
  7. Canada (4.7%)
  8. New York (3.1%)
  9. International (3.1%)

 What areas do CDS members work in?

 cds areas of work

  1. Community Development
  2. Planning and evaluation
  3. Education/teaching/training
  4. With programs/projects
  5. Research
  6. Economics
  7. Rural
  8. Leadership
  9. Extension
  10. Government
  11. Youth
  12. Business
  13. Urban
  14. Volunteers
  15. Health
  16. Tourism
  17. Sustainability

 

What career difference does CDS make?

what i like about cds word cloud

  1. Networking
  2. Knowledge sharing and learning
  3. Journal/Publishing

 what members like

This is consistent with what members like about CDS. In the member survey, people most often identified the connections they make through CDS as what they like the most, followed by the publications, and knowledge sharing.

Membership Retention

retenion graph

The findings from analyzing year to year membership lists, as well discussing with other Directors and Julie While from the management office, is that there is a core membership of 135 or so members the sign up every year (2011-2014 puts number at 106). This number is low because of some of the peculiarities of the CDS membership process being associated with the conference. The main issues with this include: a large single-year membership contingent from the conference host area dedicated members who can get the discounted membership rate for 2 conferences, but skip paying years.

Data Analysis highlights:

  • Consistent membership 2011-2014: 106 members, 40% of total memberships between 2011-2014. This demonstrates a tremendous issue with overall membership retention.
  • 38% of memberships (295 out of 800) between 2011-2014 were only members for 1 year. This data relates to the issue with regional membership in conference areas, but indicates a lack of apparent continued value and outreach to colloquial members.
  • 2013-2014 to 2014-2015 retention rate (through July 2014) = 47% according to CDS management office, but analysis of 2011-2013 shows a much lower number of 40%
  • 35 people were only members from 2011-2013, 37 people were only members from 2012-2014, and 15 people had gap years in their membership. All of this information points to issues with the membership renewal process.

Potential rationale for retention issues

  • Lack of consistent membership outreach – Some members only stay a short time because they cannot find a home in the organization and have difficulty connecting to value of membership (especially if not publishing), this could potentially isolate practitioners
  • Lack of consistent membership renewal reminders and ease of renewal process - even long time members have gap years because of lapses in the membership process
  • Conferences are too colloquial – the locals who attend the conferences cannot find benefit to continued membership beyond the conference year

Membership Committee 2015 Budget Proposal

 

Item

Description

Cost

Online advertising

Design and run ads on social media (LinkedIn, Facebook) to entice non-members connections and new contacts to join CDS

$1,000

CDS Brochure refresh

Content and graphics re-design

$2,500

Print 2000

$2,000

Postage to send brochures to CDS representatives

$500

Brochure Total

$5,000

     
 

Committee Total

$6,000

2014 -2015 Committee Members

Cindy Banyai - Co-Chair

Dan Kahl - Co-Chair

Sharon Gulick

Chris Marko

John Gulick

Rani Bhattcharyya

Kathy Macomber

Johanna Reed Adams

Tracy Marlo-Daugherty

Dennis Deerey

Christopher Cotton

Paul LaChapelle

James Wilcox

Kurt Mantonya

John McNutt

Beth Nagy

 

President's Update - CDS working for you now and for the future

Dave Lamie-crop
By Dave Lamie
 
It's been nearly two months now since many of us had the chance to rendezvous in Dubuque for our annual conference.  Thanks to all the hard work of excellent local hosts, program committees, presenters, speakers, reviewers, and the support of our sponsors, we were able to put on a great conference. Giselle Hamm, our current Vice President of Programs, is now deep into working with another great local host committee to help set the stage for the 2015 conference in Lexington, Kentucky. Chris Marko, the current Vice President of Operations, is also beginning to work with local hosts from Minnesota, who will organize the 2016 conference. And, there are multiple other conference location proposals being developed for consideration at the CDS Fall Board meeting to be held in early November.  Measured in financial terms, no one is getting rich from all of the time and energy put forward to create these wonderful opportunities for CDS members to share their knowledge and enthusiasm for what CDS represents in the world --- but, we are all enriched through participation in this effort, no matter our role.
 
Though our annual conference is, perhaps, the most visible feature of our organization, there are multiple other ways that our organization helps to foster enlightened community development around the world.  The Journal serves as a means for our members to engage in community development scholarship and for this scholarship to inform our practice.  John Green, who serves as our current editor, will be turning over the reigns to a new editor later this year.  We are in the process of finding just the right person(s) to serve in this important capacity.  Our CD Practice publication is a great companion to the Journal, allowing practitioners to share their experiences and to hone their skills as they help to make the world a better place.  The Vanguard, that you are now reading, helps to keep us all informed of what the organization and our members are doing.  And, our website serves as a portal where all of this information can be easily accessed, a place where dialogue on community development issues can be fostered, and a vehicle to deliver this content globally --- into virtually every nook and cranny the Internet occupies.   All of these tools and more are at our disposal and we invite our members to consider not only being consumers of what they provide, but to take a more active role by becoming co-creators.  
 
And, there are multiple committees and task forces working on many different issues, all with the focus of making CDS an even better organization for future generations.  As we go into the Autumn months there will be plenty of opportunities for you to consider how you want to be involved in making CDS be the very best professional organization dedicated to the mission of community development.   Many hands make light work and when a good team of folks is working well together, it doesn't really seem like work.  It seems like the right thing to do.  
 
Here's to a great beginning to a new season!

Connecting with Former Vanguard Editor Col. L R Hughes

DSC00237

 

In early August, it was my pleasure to receive a series of communications from former CDS Vanguard Editor Col. L R Hughes (for 8 years through the early 1990's). He was gracious enough to share some of his experiences as the Editor of Vanguard from when it was a printed 16-page newspaper (things have certainly changed, haven't they!?!). The main reason he reached out to me was to pass along some vintage Vanguard materials (pictured here). Let me know if you see any familiar faces or have stories to share about these classic Vanguard excerpts. Thanks again Col. Hughes for sharing this wonderful piece of Community Development Society history with me. 

DSC00236

DSC00235

 

 

CDS remembers former President Jerry Wade

Jerry Lee Wade, 73, of Columbia, died at home of cancer July 26, 2014.  He was born in Mason City, IA, January 29, 1941, son of Ruth W. Liptrap Wade and Joseph Anderson Wade.

 He attended the University of South Dakota, and earned a B.A. in Sociology, an M.A. in Community Development and a Ph.D. in Rural Sociology at the University of Missouri. Jerry taught at Sangamon State University (now University of Illinois at Springfield) and served as a Community Development Specialist with Extension at the University of Missouri.  With Rex Campbell, he co-authored Society and Environment, the Coming Collision.

Jerry was a State Extension Specialist for 21 years, and a developer and instructor with the Community Development Academy, and an instructor and director of the Heartland Economic Development Course for 5 years.  He spent several long-term stays in South Africa, teaching community economic development professionals and conducting workshops in villages.  His understanding of rural economic needs was recognized internationally as his Rusty Bucket became the symbol for economic loss and a starting point for regaining community economic strength.  

Jerry lived his philosophy of community service.  He served 16 years on the Columbia Planning and Zoning Commission, 9 of them as chairman; and one term as Columbia Fourth Ward City Councilman.   In office and out, he worked with fellow Columbians to empower citizens, strengthen the local economy and plan for growth.

He was president of the Community Development Society and, after retirement, served as president and membership chair of the Audubon Society of Missouri, and was a founder and treasurer of the Missouri Bird Conservation Initiative Foundation

In the course of 49 years of marriage to Mary Kay Edgington (Edge) a succession of daughters became members of the family, Kim, by birth, and Kat, Jane, Nili and Helen by choice.  He cherished them all.

Jerry is survived by his wife, Edge, daughter Kimberly and son-in-law David Bones, and grandchildren Elliot and Sophia Bones, all of Columbia; and brother, James M. Wade of Las Vegas, NV.

A celebration of Jerry’s life was held the day of his death. The attendees of that tribute were testimony to his character and legacy.  There will be no other memorial service.  As a final act of service, Jerry donated his body to the University of Missouri for medical education.  Those wishing to contribute to a memorial fund to Jerry may do so in his name to a charity of their choice or to either the Audubon Society of Missouri or the Missouri Bird Conservation Initiative, both at 2101 W. Broadway, PMB 122, Columbia, MO 65203-1261.  

 “Former councilman and bird enthusiast Jerry Wade dies,” Colombia Daily Tribune, July 28, 2014 http://www.columbiatribune.com/news/local/former-councilman-and-bird-enthusiast-jerry-wade-dies/article_7490a5a6-6021-5c05-8313-c6f03286ffe0.html