CDS Blog

Jan 15

I am the current Editor of CDS's Community Development. My tenure will end in July 2015. Proposals for the new Editor are being accepted. You can contact Abbie Gaffey for more information (see below). --John Green

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Call for Proposals
Editor for the Community Development Society’s Journal
Community Development

Position to be filled August 2015

Community Development is a well-respected interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal on community development issues. The journal is internationally recognized as a high quality outlet for scholarly and applied research and practical applications. Community Development is published five times per year. This schedule incorporates two special issues on specific topics, edited by Guest Editors working with the Editor. The journal is published electronically and in print by Taylor & Francis, and the editorial process involves use of ScholarOne, an online management program.

If you are interested in applying to serve as Editor of Community Development, please contact Abbie Gaffey, Chair of the Communications Committee. She can provide more information on the criteria and proposal process.

Abbie Gaffey
Community Development Society Secretary & Chair of the Communications Committee
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
(712) 539-1169

Jan 13

By Gisele Hamm

Keynote Speaker, Michael Rios

One of the highlights of this year’s conference will be the engaging keynote speakers that will be joining us including Michael Rios. Michael is associate professor of urban design and chair of the Community Development Graduate Group at the University of California, Davis. Drawing from architecture, human geography, and urban planning, his research and writing focuses on marginality and the social practice of design, planning, and community development. Critical essays have appeared in The Informal American City: Beyond Taco Trucks and Day Labor, Insurgent Public Space: Guerrilla Urbanism and the Remaking of Contemporary Cities, Beyond Zuccotti Park: Freedom of Assembly and the Occupation of Public Space, and Expanding Architecture: Design as Activism. His co-edited book, Diálogos: Placemaking in Latino Communities, takes note of how Latinos are shaping the American landscape and considers how these changes both challenge and offer insight into placemaking practices in an increasingly multi-ethnic world. Michael is past president of the Association for Community Design and the inaugural director of the Hamer Center for Community Design. He received his Ph.D. in Geography from The Pennsylvania State University and Master of Architecture and Master of City Planning degrees from the University of California, Berkeley.

Fitting with our theme of Creativity and Culture, Michael’s keynote presentation will be “Negotiating the Place of Culture and the Culture of Place.” Unlike the problems of sprawl, environmental degradation, and climate change, there are no straightforward technical solutions to working more effectively with culturally diverse communities. In this plenary session, Michael Rios will discuss the difference that culture makes and how places can be viewed as sites of world-making through negotiations of belonging, authorship, and power to establish what groups can expect of one another. Negotiations are the basis for agreements and provide shared experiences that maintain relationships into the future. These “cultural contracts” measure the degree to which values and commitments are exchanged between groups—including professionals and the publics they purport to serve. Implications for community development include greater attention to cross-cultural practices between individuals and among different social groups to determine why place matters, for whom, and with what results.

Conference Abstract Submissions

If you have not yet submitted your abstract for a presentation at the CDS conference, there’s still time! The deadline for conference abstracts is Saturday, January 31, 2015. Instructions on submitting an abstract is available here: CDS Call for Abstracts Instructions. The online submission form can be accessed here: CDS Online Abstract Submission Form.

Pre-Conference Workshops

Proposals are being accepted through Sunday, February 15, 2015 for pre-conference workshops. CDS currently has space to accommodate a limited number of pre-conference workshops to be held on Sunday, July 19th in conjunction with the Annual Conference.   More information can be found here:  CDS Pre-Conference Workshop Proposals.

Please join us in Lexington in July as we celebrate Creativity and Culture in Community Development!

Last modified on Wednesday, 14 January 2015 09:54
Jan 13

By Dave Lamie

I hope that the New Year finds you healthy, energized, and excited about what life is bringing you. As we witness with horror the brutality that our species is capable of inflicting upon one another, it is easy to become confused and bewildered.  Our old ways of thinking about things may not work as well as they did in our youth.  We turn to the sages of our history for insight and understanding, yet they do not seem to speak to us as they did before. Yet, we fear that if we abandon wholesale our beliefs we might jettison something essential, even sacred. So, we spend time sorting through it all, carefully putting those things that we still value in their place, discarding that which does not seem to work for us.  
As community development professionals we should consider a similar sorting process. We should use our evaluation results to help us craft better programs and interventions.  We should take stock of the way we currently do things and consider if there are not better, more effective, or more efficient ways of doing things.  And, we should probably go about examining our underlying value statements to deliberate on just how important they are to us and whether or not they should be modified to better reflect current realities.  This process might even lead us to new paradigms and patterns of thinking about things that simply work better.  
It is in this spirit that I propose that we undertake a process of revisiting, reviewing, and possibly revising our most sacred statements: The CDS Principles of Good Practice.  Over the next few months I hope to engage a selection of CDS members to help us in this review process. I want to be sure we include some of our newest members as well as some long-standing ones.  We need to have confidence that these statements speak as clearly to CD professionals today as they did when they were first adopted.  
At the end of the day, we might wind up with exactly the same thing we started with…and that is perfectly acceptable. Or, some completely new, completely relevant statements might be developed. Don't worry, we won't officially change anything without properly involving the CDS membership. Your involvement in the evolution of the Society is of vital importance.
Last modified on Wednesday, 14 January 2015 09:53
Nov 17

Call for Submissions

(Workshops, Paper/Program Presentations, Panel Sessions & Posters)
2015 Annual Meeting of the Community Development Society
Hilton Lexington Downtown Hotel
Lexington, Kentucky– July19-22, 2015
Deadline: January 31, 2015, 11:59p.m. (Central Standard Time)

Creativity and Culture: Community Development Approaches for Strengthening Health, Environment, Economic Vibrancy, Social Justice and Democracy

Community activists and developers are integrating the arts and culture into building vibrant communities. Increasingly, groups and organizations are leveraging the arts and imagination to engage citizens in community development. In doing so, they create places and organizations that support economic diversity and strengthen the aesthetics of communities. There is a growing awareness that the arts can serve as a vehicle to bring people together. There is interest in making places more intentionally open for diverse economic opportunities and fostering connections across cultures which makes communities more vibrant and welcoming.

Culture is also gaining more attention in community development as society becomes more diverse through demographic shifts including greater concentrations of the elderly, immigrants, ethnic diversity, and counter-culture movements. As a result, it could be argued that there isn’t a single public but multiple publics. Community developers are challenged to be culturally aware and sensitive as they weave these multiple publics together into a community of shared vision, interests and investment.

The 2015 Community Development Society conference offers a platform for dialogue about community development with an emphasis on the roles of creativity and culture in framing community issues and responses. We invite you to join us July 19-22, 2015 in Lexington, Kentucky in the heart of the world’s most avid horse culture, to share your research and learning about how the arts and creative expression are strengthening the bonds of communities around the world.

This venue provides opportunities for spirited and lively exchanges about community development practice, learning, and scholarship. Won’t you join us?

Who Should Submit a Proposal?

Anyone who has engaged in community development work, especially work related to the conference theme, is encouraged to submit a proposal.
It is the goal of the Program Committee to formulate a balanced mixture of accepted submissions with pre-selected speakers, mobile learning workshops, our annual banquet, business meeting, off-site hosted events, and other networking opportunities. Every consideration will be given to creating an event from which all participants will substantially benefit.

How to Complete Your Submission:

Beginning Thursday, November 20, submissions will be accepted at:
http://comm-dev.org/about-us/2015-conference/call-for-abstracts

The following instructions provide you with a step-by-step process for submitting an abstract for the 2015 annual meeting:

STEP 1: Complete Contact Information

Please provide the following information: (a) date of your submission; (b) your name; (c) organizational affiliation; (d) email address;(e) complete mailing address (include specific department or bureau, if applicable); (f) telephone and fax numbers; and (g) name/email of your additional presenter(s).

STEP 2: Enter the Title of Your Proposed Presentation

STEP 3: Specify the Topic from the List that Most Closely Reflects the Nature of Your Submission.

Conference organizers will be reviewing submissions based on two areas: conference sub-themes and Community Development Society tracks. Please select a conference sub-theme (such as health, environment, social justice, and so on) and a CDS track (such as general community development, planning and evaluation, community development education,and so on).

Submissions relating to any of the sub-themes and CDS tracks on this list will be reviewed. A description of each sub-theme and CDS track can be found at the end of this document.

NOTE: These conference sub-themes and CDS tracks are designed to help the Program Committee determine the breadth of submissions being considered for the 2015 meeting. Please note that the final session themes and tracks that appear in the conference program may differ from those listed.

STEP 4: Indicate the Format of Your Presentation.

You have SEVEN PRESENTATION OPTIONS from which to choose. Below are the formats you can choose and the amount time associated with each format:

NOTE: The time and locations specified below are intended to serve as general guidelines. Please note that they maybe subject to change in the event that submissions that are approved for presentation at the 2015 meeting exceed expectation:

30 Minute Sessions (20 minute presentation, 10 minutes discussion)

Research Paper: Showcasing community development theory, methodological advances, or applied studies

-- or --

Practice/Outreach Program: Highlighting an innovative project/program you have implemented that is having a positive impact on people, communities, and/or regions

60 Minute Sessions (Allow at least 10 minutes for discussion)

Small Panel Session: Organizing 3-5 individuals with a diversity of perspectives on a topic of importance and relevance to the community development field

-- or --

Innovation Session: Propose an entirely “out-of-the-box” innovative session that connects with the Creativity and Culture theme of the conference while demonstrating the CDS Principles of Good Practice

90 Minute Sessions (Allow at least 15 minutes for discussion)

Workshop: An in-depth, interactive session sharing an innovative program or project that CDS members might be able to readily adopt in their own communities

-- or –

Large Panel Session: Organizing at least 4 individuals with a diversity of perspectives on a topic of importance and relevance to the community development field

Poster: Displaying your research practice efforts through the use of a poster (will be showcase data special time during the meeting)

STEP 5: Select up to Three Acceptable Format Options for Your Proposed Presentation:

Since it will be unlikely that we can accommodate all requests for the various types of presentation formats, you are urged to provide upto three acceptable options for your presentation. For example, if your first choice is to do a workshop but we are unable to accommodate your request, give us your second choice in terms of the format for your presentation. Likewise, if a third choice is acceptable, please provide that as well. For example, would you be willing to present in a Practice/Outreach session as a second choice or in a Poster Session as a third choice? Just let us know your top three preferences (in priority order) in terms of the format for your presentation.

STEP 6: Provide an Abstract of Your Proposed Presentation (300 word limit)

STEP 7: Prepare a shorter, 50-word Summary of Your Proposed Presentation

(for display in conference program, if accepted).

STEP 8: Indicate if You Will Need any Audio-Visual Equipment.

Please tell us what specific equipment you will need. NOTE: Overhead projectors, LCD projectors (for PowerPoint presentations) and audio equipment will be available for your use. However, you must bring your own laptop for your presentation or make plans with another person in your session to use his/her laptop.

STEP 9: Provide an electronic copy of your abstract.

STEP 10: Does Your Submission Embrace the CDS Principles of Good Practice?

Your work should embrace the Community Development Society’s Principles of Good Practice. Please review these principles highlighted at the end of this document. Place a checkmark in the“YES” box if you agree that your submission is consistent with these principles. These principles can be found at the end of this document.

STEP 11: Explain How Your Submission Relates to the Creativity and Culture Conference Theme

Deadline Date:
All proposals must be submitted using the CDS online submission system by 11:59 p.m., SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 (Central Standard Time).

A Special Note to Our International Association for Community Development Colleagues and Other International Participants:

We welcome our IACD and other international colleagues to take part in the 2015 CDS Conference. Named in the top 50 places to visit in a lifetime by National Geographic Traveler, Lexington, Kentucky will provide an enriching experience for you while you are in the United States.

We urge you to submit well-developed abstract proposals to be part of this great event. Due to the additional time needed by many of our international conference participants to arrange for travel to the United States for the July 2015 conference, we are providing a limited opportunity for you to submit your conference abstract and receive an earlier confirmation regarding the acceptance of your presentation. While the official date for general abstract acceptance notification will be in March 2015, we are setting aside a limited number of slots for early notification for international submissions. Thus, if you submit your conference presentation proposal by December 15, 2014, we will notify you of your proposal acceptance/non-acceptance by Thursday, January 15, 2015. If you are notified that your abstract is accepted as a presentation for the 2015 CDS conference, you will receive a registration form with your acceptance email so that you may register early. Please note: All international colleagues are welcome to submit abstracts during the regular call for abstracts timeframe if they do not wish to submit for the early notification option.

Please note that the CDS does not have sufficient resources to help defray the travel expenses of our international attendees. However, if you’re a CDS member, you may be eligible to apply for one of the travel scholarships available for members taking part in a conference outside of their home continent.
An announcement regarding the 2015 travel scholarship application process will be released during the early part of 2015, so you are encouraged to review the guidelines once they are released to see if you might be eligible to apply. The announcement will be posted on the CDS website.
Conference Registration and Hotel Reservations:

Information on the annual registration fee and hotel rates/reservation process will be available on the CDS website soon. Please check this site for up-to-date information on the 2015 conference: www.comm-dev.org.

Questions?
Conference Program Questions:Feel free to submit any questions about the 2015 program to Gisele Hamm, CDS Vice President for Programs at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Online Submission Questions: For issues with the proposal submission process, Please contact Karen Holt at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

CDS Principles of Good Practice

We believe that adherence to the Community Development Society's Principles of Good Practice are essential to sound community development.

  • Promote active and representative participation toward enabling all community members to meaningfully influence the decisions that affect their lives.
  • Engage community members in learning about and understanding community issues, and the economic, social, environmental, political, psychological, and impacts associated with alternative courses of action.
  • Incorporate the diverse interests and cultures of the community in the community development process; and disengage from support any effort that is likely to adversely affect the disadvantaged members of a community.
  • Work actively to enhance the leadership capacity community members, leaders, and groups within the community.
  • Be open to using the full range actionstrategies to work toward the long-term sustainability and well-being of the community.

The CDS 2015 Conference Theme is:

Creativity and Culture: Community Development Approaches for Strengthening Health, Environment, Economic Vibrancy, Social Justice and Democracy

1. Please select at least one of the following conference sub-themes:

Creative Community Development Approaches for Strengthening Health
Presentations focusing on research and effective process for integrating community development and improving health.

Creative Community Development Approaches for Strengthening the Environment
Presentations focusing on research and effective process for integrating community development and improving environmental conditions.

Creative Community Development Approaches for Strengthening Economic Vibrancy
Presentations focusing on research and effective process for integrating community development and strengthening economic vibrancy.

Creative Community Development Approaches for Strengthening Social Justice
Presentations focusing on research and effective process for integrating community development and addressing social justice.

Creative Community Development Approaches for Strengthening Democracy
Presentations focusing on research and effective process for integrating community development and engaging citizens or strengthen democracy.

Creative Community Development Approaches for Strengthening Social or Cultural Well-Being
Presentations focusing on research and effective process for integrating community development and strengthening social or cultural well-being.

2. Please select one of the following CDS tracks:

General Community Development Practice and Process
Presentations focused on community development practices, processes, and theories broadly defined.

Planning and Evaluation
Presentations focused on planning and evaluation as utilized in community development processes and practices.

Community Development Education
Presentations related to teaching and education of community development theories, processes, and practices in classrooms or other educational settings.

Scholarship and Research
Presentations focused on research and scholarship related to community development.

Community Leadership
Presentations related to leaders and leadership in community settings.

Economic Development
Presentations focused on the practices, processes, and theories of community economic improvement.

Rural Community Development
Presentations focused on the practices, processes, and theories of community development in rural settings.

Youth in Community Development
Presentations about the role of youth in community development practices, processes, and theories.

International Community Development
Presentations related to community development practices, processes, and theories in international settings.

Last modified on Wednesday, 19 November 2014 16:18
Nov 14

By Dave. Lamie

Your Board of Directors just invested a couple of days in Lexington, Kentucky, carrying out the business of the organization and in a strategic planning activity designed to help us focus on priorities for the coming year and beyond. As we further refine our thinking we fully intend to engage the committees and broader membership in this process. I was very encouraged by how well we all worked together and how passionate each and every member is about the our shared vision and future success of YOUR organization. Stay tuned for more details and then join with us to help make CDS the global lifelong learning partner for CD professionals.

We heard from the Lexington-based Local Host Committee about their plans for the 2015 conference. I will leave those details to the Program Committee and or local hosts to provide. But, I have confidence in saying that "You will not want to miss this one!"

Now is the time to consider how you want to be involved in CDS. Do you want to work with a committee? Do you want to present at conference? Do you want to write an article? Do you want to serve as a reviewer? How about serving as a journal editor!? Do you want to run for office? Do you want to make a financial gift? Or, do you want to participate in some other way? Just let us know and we will help you.

Remember that CDS is a community unto itself and should serve as a bright example of how we hope the communities we serve will function. We will never be perfect in this regard  And one person's perfection is another's hell, but we should always be seeking to improve, to learn from our mistakes, to be inclusive of all voices, and to celebrate our achievements. We cannot pretend to be such an example unless and until we see our membership engaged at many levels, motivated not by guilt or shame, but by a true desire to participate in something bigger than self, something that reciprocates by providing the nourishment necessary to sustain you in your chosen profession of community development.

Nov 14

By Cindy Banyai

Executive Summary

This report discusses the composition of the 2014 Community Development Society (CDS) obtained from the membership roster and the most recent Membership Survey.

This information is being analyzed to better inform the CDS marketing strategy, as well as to tailor conference components (mobile workshops).

Here are the top findings:

  • Members report being a part of CDS for an average of 11.3 years. They are largely from the Midwest, but there is a sizeable international component of the membership.
  • Aside from community development specifically, members are most involved with planning and evaluation, education and training, and dealing with projects and programs.
  • Networking, knowledge sharing and learning, and the journal and publications are the most valued components of being a member of CDS.

Membership data from 2011-2014 has also been analyzed to better understand the year to year membership retention rates and to set targets for future growth in this area. The major findings are that we have a major issue with membership retention, with only 40% of members renewing consistently. The issues stem from a lack of continued value for conference-local memberships and problems with the membership renewal system.

The Membership Committee requests $6,000 in 2015 to help address some of these recommendations.


Membership Composition

Average member reports being involved with organization for 11.3 years

Where are CDS members from?

Only a few members in each state, but membership is Midwest-heavy

Top Origins of CDS Members 2012-2013

  1. Minnesota (12.5%)
  2. Kentucky (7%)
  3. Wisconsin (6.2%)
  4. Ohio (5.4%)
  5. Missouri (5.4%)
  6. Illinois (4.7%)
  7. Canada (4.7%)
  8. New York (3.1%)
  9. International (3.1%)

 What areas do CDS members work in?

 cds areas of work

  1. Community Development
  2. Planning and evaluation
  3. Education/teaching/training
  4. With programs/projects
  5. Research
  6. Economics
  7. Rural
  8. Leadership
  9. Extension
  10. Government
  11. Youth
  12. Business
  13. Urban
  14. Volunteers
  15. Health
  16. Tourism
  17. Sustainability

 

What career difference does CDS make?

what i like about cds word cloud

  1. Networking
  2. Knowledge sharing and learning
  3. Journal/Publishing

 what members like

This is consistent with what members like about CDS. In the member survey, people most often identified the connections they make through CDS as what they like the most, followed by the publications, and knowledge sharing.

Membership Retention

retenion graph

The findings from analyzing year to year membership lists, as well discussing with other Directors and Julie While from the management office, is that there is a core membership of 135 or so members the sign up every year (2011-2014 puts number at 106). This number is low because of some of the peculiarities of the CDS membership process being associated with the conference. The main issues with this include: a large single-year membership contingent from the conference host area dedicated members who can get the discounted membership rate for 2 conferences, but skip paying years.

Data Analysis highlights:

  • Consistent membership 2011-2014: 106 members, 40% of total memberships between 2011-2014. This demonstrates a tremendous issue with overall membership retention.
  • 38% of memberships (295 out of 800) between 2011-2014 were only members for 1 year. This data relates to the issue with regional membership in conference areas, but indicates a lack of apparent continued value and outreach to colloquial members.
  • 2013-2014 to 2014-2015 retention rate (through July 2014) = 47% according to CDS management office, but analysis of 2011-2013 shows a much lower number of 40%
  • 35 people were only members from 2011-2013, 37 people were only members from 2012-2014, and 15 people had gap years in their membership. All of this information points to issues with the membership renewal process.

Potential rationale for retention issues

  • Lack of consistent membership outreach – Some members only stay a short time because they cannot find a home in the organization and have difficulty connecting to value of membership (especially if not publishing), this could potentially isolate practitioners
  • Lack of consistent membership renewal reminders and ease of renewal process - even long time members have gap years because of lapses in the membership process
  • Conferences are too colloquial – the locals who attend the conferences cannot find benefit to continued membership beyond the conference year

Membership Committee 2015 Budget Proposal

 

Item

Description

Cost

Online advertising

Design and run ads on social media (LinkedIn, Facebook) to entice non-members connections and new contacts to join CDS

$1,000

CDS Brochure refresh

Content and graphics re-design

$2,500

Print 2000

$2,000

Postage to send brochures to CDS representatives

$500

Brochure Total

$5,000

     
 

Committee Total

$6,000

2014 -2015 Committee Members

Cindy Banyai - Co-Chair

Dan Kahl - Co-Chair

Sharon Gulick

Chris Marko

John Gulick

Rani Bhattcharyya

Kathy Macomber

Johanna Reed Adams

Tracy Marlo-Daugherty

Dennis Deerey

Christopher Cotton

Paul LaChapelle

James Wilcox

Kurt Mantonya

John McNutt

Beth Nagy

 

Last modified on Tuesday, 18 November 2014 19:23
Oct 13
By Dave Lamie
 
Creating a quality life for ourselves, our families, and our communities is at the heart and soul of our existence as community developers.  Our Principles of Good Practice speak to these values that we all share and it is these values that draw us, a community of members, together so that we can find ways to do more and better than what we can muster alone.  Further, our values speak to not only the mere fact that we need to work together to achieve great things for ourselves and others; they also speak to certain qualitative aspects of our coming together; inclusion of all who have a stake in outcomes,  the use of quality  information coming from multiple sources,  minority voices being heard…and considered, and advocacy for those without a voice.   We have a certain faith in the prospect that it is not merely the individual, but collections of individuals who bind themselves together in reciprocal relationships that, when push comes to shove, transcend the interests of the individual, while still respecting individual autonomy.  The art and science of community development.  
 
These values are seldom easy to live out, and we often fall short of our ideals.   Dominant cultures that can exist in both the communities of place and interest often work against these principles.  We are likely fooling ourselves if we think we can exercise our principles while working with communities when we do not practice them consistently with our friends, family, and colleagues.  Some of us surely do better than others when measured in absolute terms.  But, isn't it more important to know that we are all on a path toward improvement, no matter where we find ourselves on the path?  I buy into that idea.  
 
In order to know where we are on our journey toward becoming our better principled selves in this fast-paced world,  we need to find the time and space to be reflective enough to better understand what path we are on and in which direction we are heading.  Communities need this,  too!  That is why one of the fundamental questions of planning is "Where Are We Now?" --- the reality check.  This question precedes "Where Do We Want to Be?" and "How Do We Get There?", perhaps for good reason.  For some individuals, this might mean lengthy silent retreat settings while others might find this respite over their own cook stove or by taking in an art exhibit.   We hope that CDS helps to facilitate and nurture this reflective process by serving as a gathering place for kindred spirits who are on a journey of discovering how they can most effectively bring about positive change in their world.  
 
In a few years, CDS will reach its half century mark.  In a few days, I will beat her to this milestone.   Perhaps that is why I am in this reflective mood and so encouraging others to be as well.  Perhaps it is because the CDS Board will be engaging in some strategic planning at our fall meeting and I'm just trying to get in the mood.  Perhaps it is just the coming of Autumn.
 
Whatever the reason,  I find myself in this frame of mind, I would like to encourage those of you who attended to 2014 conference in Dubuque, to reflect upon your experience, and help us to learn how to put on even better events going forward by completing our online conference survey.  Finally, I hope that you all will begin to make plans for the 2015 conference in Lexington, KY so that we can once again come together to reflect, share, and figure out how to propel ourselves along our individual and collective paths.   
 
Last modified on Tuesday, 14 October 2014 19:10
Oct 04

The Community Development Society wants you!  The following positions are up for election:

  • Vice President of Operations
    • A 3-year term that moves into Vice President of Program and President
  • Three seats on the Board of Directors
    • A 3-year term

Nominees for these positions can expect to meet (remotely) on a monthly basis to direct the operations of the Society.  Committee leadership roles are typically assigned to each Board member.  The Board typically meets in person twice each year—late November/early December at the site of the upcoming annual conference; and at the annual conference (generally held in July).  There is no compensation provided and the cost of traveling for the two in person meetings is borne by the member (some exceptions have been made for traveling to the mid-year meeting, but attendance at the annual conference is expected).

The operations of the Society are supported by a professional management firm.  A current roster of the Board of Directors and Officers can be found at http://www.comm-dev.org/about-us/board-of-directors.  Please contact any of them to discuss in more detail what the responsibilities and rewards of being involved with CDS are.

To submit a nomination for any of the positions listed above, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or the CDS Business Office at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or any current Board member.  To be eligible for the ballot, nominees must be current members in good standing.  Please only nominate a peer that has agreed in advance to serve if elected.  Self-nominations are encouraged.

Last modified on Monday, 06 October 2014 15:03
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