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Lisa M. Gilchrist

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Family Activities at the CDS Conference, July 14-17,2019

Submitted by the Conference Committee

Columbia and surrounding area have so many opportunities for every age. If you want to learn more, see http://www.visitcolumbiamo.com, or https://www.visitmo.com/. You can also download the official Missouri travel guide at https://maddendigitalbooks.com/mtg19/.

 

Meanwhile, Doris Littrell is coordinating family activities based on interest during the CDS Conference. Here are the wonderful options she has pulled together that will be sure to please children, grandchildren, spouses, significant others and friends you may wish to bring with you to CDS.

 

Sunday, July 14, and Monday, July 15 (8-9:00 a.m.): Knowledgeable Columbia ambassadors will staff a resource table with brochures, handouts, etc., for families at the Bond Life Sciences Center registration.

 

Monday, July 15, 9:00-11:45 a.m.: A free walking tour of downtown Columbia that can be focused on family interests such as public art, African American history, University of Missouri campus, museums, gardens, etc.

 

An African American history group has markers all around town. We can provide a guide if requested and could end at the history Blind Boone home (no charge but donations accepted at suggested rate of $25/hour).

 

There’s also an optional Trolley Tour–www.tigertrolley.net at $30/person but there is a minimum number required. A choice of four tours are offered or one can be customized. The four include Welcome to Columbia, Cultural Arts (which includes the Art and Archaeology Museum), College Town USA., and Historical Tour.

 

After lunch on their own, we have the option for Monday from 1-5:00 p.m. for indoor recreation (yes July is hot in Missouri) at the ARC where there’s swimming, track, basketball, exercise, etc. This will require your own means of transport (but we do have Uber, cabs, etc., and you can carpool). If we have a group of 20 or more, a group rate can be obtained, but we have to give at least two weeks’ advance notice ($2.80 for kids and seniors, $4.45 for adults vs. regular rates of $3.75 for kids and seniors, $6.00 for adults).

 

Monday night is free for all to enjoy dinner downtown and the you will want to register your guests for the Ice Cream Social at Orr Street Studios from 8-9:30 p.m. We have purposely keep the price to $5.00 per guest for this fun time to mingle and enjoy legendary Central Dairy ice cream.

 

Tuesday morning, July 16, 9-11:30 a.m., we will offer an option to visit to the Boone County Historical and Cultural Society and Maplewood Barn at Nifong Park. Personal transportation is required.

 

Tuesday afternoon, 1–5:30 p.m., could be spent indoors again touring for free the University’s Art and Archaeology Museum and Anthropology Museum, both located at Mizzou North.  We can arrange a docent to lead the tours, with a month’s notice (that’s June 15). Personal transportation is required.

 

So do plan to bring your guests with you to the conference. And we hope you come early or stay late to enjoy many of the experiences that Columbia, Mid-Missouri and the rest of the state offer.

 

If you have an interest in any of these options that Doris has put together or other questions about activities your guests might enjoy, please let Doris know before June 15 (the sooner the better) at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Other than the Ice Cream Social registration, all of these require your communication with Doris.

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Governing Non-profit Organizations

Governing Non-profit Organizations
Submitted by Margaret Stout
Associate Professor
Department of Public Administration
John D. Rockefeller IV School of Policy and Politics
West Virginia University

With the publication of the revised bylaws of the Community Development Society in this edition of the Vanguard, some of us may have organizational governance on our minds. In simple terms, governance is the process of steering an organization by establishing policies and procedures and then making decisions accordingly. In a membership organization like CDS, the members establish the destination and the board of directors is responsible for making decisions about how best to get there. Ideally, the board receives ongoing guidance from committees composed of members so that ongoing input is used to chart the course and make course corrections when necessary.

It’s of value to note that many CDS members work in higher education—a realm of large bureaucracies with byzantine governance policies and procedures that govern academic and administrative domains. Those functions are then delegated according to different faculty and staff roles. However, many other CDS members work in non-profit organizations that are governed by a board of directors and operated by paid staff, often supported by outside service providers and consultants.

CDS governance has largely relied on volunteers who engage in service via the board of directors, standing organizational committees, and various operational ad hoc committees. Furthermore, CDS has relied heavily on contracted services to fulfill administrative needs. However, at some point in most non-profit organizations’ developmental path, increased professionalization is required to stabilize administrative and management functions and ensure organizational sustainability.

Both the previous and current board of directors believe that time has come for CDS. To more adequately support the volunteers and maintain stable operations, the board determined that a part-time Managing Director was needed, and Justin Dollard was hired to fulfill that role. Furthermore, the board decided in July 2018 that our organizational structure and Policies and Operational Guidelines needed a full review in order to move the board of directors from an operating model to a policy model of governance. This developmental process began in earnest at the October 2018 board retreat.

To clarify, an operating or working board of directors completes the lion’s share of organizational functions, including governance. A governance or policy board of directors focuses on steering the organization, while staff and contracted service providers do the work required to keep the organization moving on that course. This is not to say that a policy board no longer completes important operational functions. Rather, the balance shifts more toward governance and away from operations.

To support this style of governance, something more than an administrator is needed. Typically, non-profit organizations have an Executive Director who supports the board in setting policies and procedures and oversees or personally executes their implementation. As the revised bylaws indicate, this is the course CDS is now following and this chart will guide the board’s review of the Policies and Operational Guidelines. Stay tuned for ongoing information about our progress!

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Community Participation in Health Programs or Self-care?

Submitted by Maryam Ahmadian
Affiliate Faculty
George Mason University
IACD&CDS Board Member and Director

Community participation does not only represent taking part in an action planned by health care professionals in a top-down approach. The concepts of health promotion, self-care and community participation also developed during in 1970s in the developed countries. The purpose of this short blog is to review community participation models in health proposed by Rifkin and to prompt the role of individual’s participation in the decision-making process towards preventive behaviors. It is not applied to formulate a single model to embody community participation in health programs. Furthermore, the previous models didn’t explicate other relevant factors (e.g. cultural, social, behavioral, economic, or structural) affecting community participation in health programs especially the power of self-care.

Another challenging issue is the boundary between participation and activity which is not measured in the quality of community participation in health programs. Rifkin (1991) stated that there are five levels of public participation in health programs as follows:(1) Health benefits (2) Program activities (3) Implementation (4) Monitor and evaluation (5) Planning. These approaches also restate the three models of community participation in health: compliance, contribution, and community control by Rifkin (1986). Conceptualizations of the models and levels of community participation in health programs are seldom scrutinized in previous studies, nevertheless community participation in health programs increasingly documented as a key factor to improve and maintain health interventions and its outcomes.

To understand the importance of self-care within community participation levels and models in health programs, this short blog places an emphasis on health benefits and compliance which underline on individual’s participation in health programs and people’s decision-making power which could be inclined to a partnership between health care professionals and individuals. In fact, self-care would provide the whole community with the capacity to cause sustainable changes at all levels, individual and community to achieve and maintain optimal health. It could benefit those especially who tolerate the greatest burden of chronic disease such as cancer diseases. Self-care, community participation in preventive programs, health empowerment and sustainability of health developments in preventive behaviors would alter this discussion further. Self-care has the potential to increase the intentions of individuals to perform preventive behaviors, which can promote early detection of cancer diseases.

Future research should evaluate targeted communication interventions for addressing self-care and seeking health benefits, patient’s compliance to health promotion recommendations for at-risk communities. Without any doubt, self-care as a first level or model of community participation in health makes individuals and the community engage in health activities to maintain their health and well-being.

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Meet the CDS Practice Editor

Submitted by Anne M. Cafer

Anne M. Cafer is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Mississippi. She also serves as Coordinator for the Community Based Research Collaborative housed within the UM Center for Population Studies, of which she is an affiliated researcher. She holds a BSc in both molecular biology and sociology, an MA in anthropology, and a PhD in Rural Sociology. She works primarily in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Mississippi Delta. Her research uses a systems approach to examine community resilience and social change around food procurement, agricultural systems, environmental sustainability, and community health/nutrition at the community level, both domestically and internationally. She also has an interest in scholarship of teaching, specifically the impacts of community engaged learning on both community and student outcomes. Her advanced courses are community based participatory research courses where students are actively involved with community stakeholders to explore collaborative solutions to non-resilient systems. Dr. Cafer is a former Borlaug Scholar in Global Food Security, a member of the prestigious Rollins Society at the University of Missouri, and has worked as a consultant with groups such as Land O’Lakes International Development and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. She is also a Andrew Carnegie Fellowship nominee.

Her previous editorial experience includes founding and serving as Editor-in-Chief for a student run and targeted publication, Agrarian Frontiers: A Rural Studies Review, at the University of Missouri, as well as Assistant Editor for the Nebraska Anthropologist a publication of AnthroGroup, a student based organization at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her most recent editorial experience is serving as Guest Editor for Community Development for a special issue on community resilience, slated for the second issue of 2019. The nature of these publications has given her extensive experience in recruitment and solicitation of manuscripts, book reviews, and reviewers.

As editor, her vision for CD Practice is to consistently publish high quality, peer reviewed, practice-based pieces that address salient issues within community development practice and complement the types of scholarly work being published in Community Development, as well as increase readership of the publication. To this end she aims to publish two issues a year. The first, a themed issue around specific practice topics; second, an end-of-year issues that will include shorter practice related pieces from authors who have published in Community Development during that calendar year. As editor she looks forward to working with society members to promote their work! 

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50th Anniversary Conference - Proposals Submitted, Volunteer Moderators needed, Key Note Speaker update

Submitted by Jane Leonard

And the submissions are in from around the world!

We’re happy to report we have over 100 Call for Proposal submissions in from 14 countries for the 2019 CDS Annual International Conference and 50th Anniversary celebration!

Countries represented are Australia, Botswana, Cameroon, Germany, India, Italy, Malaysia, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, South Africa, Taiwan, United Kingdom, and the USA). Submissions from the USA are from across the country, coast-to-coast – so a nice mix! 

Thanks everyone for getting the word out! Non-USA based presenters will be notified by Feb. 1, 2019; USA-based presenters notified by March 1, 2019

Volunteers needed for the 2019 Conference!

Make history! Be a 50th anniversary CDS volunteer! 

Serve as a moderator for one (or more) of the many concurrent break-out sessions we will have over the course of the July conference. Moderators get everyone started on time, welcome attendees and introduce presenters in the break-out room, and get everyone out the door on time. Contact Jane Leonard at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you are interested in helping out!


Keynote Speaker Spotlight:

Tawanna Black, Founder & CEO of the Center for Economic Inclusion based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, will join us in Missouri as the keynote speaker on Tuesday, July 16, 2019.

She is a nationally recognized thought leader well known for influencing, inspiring and equipping cross-sector leaders to transform a personal conviction for equality into actions that produce equitable and thriving communities.

Ms. Black has led the Northside Funders Group since 2013, a place-based, collective impact organization of 20 corporate, community and private foundations, and public-sector investors committed to aligning investments and strategies to catalyze racial and economic equity in North Minneapolis.

In 2018 she launched the Center for Economic Inclusion, an unprecedented cross-sector social enterprise committed to strengthening the Minneapolis-St. Paul region’s civic infrastructure and collective capacity to disrupt systems and influence market forces to catalyze shared prosperity and advance an inclusive economy.

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Meet Our Board - Huston Gibson

By Huston Gibson

Hello CDS! My name is Huston Gibson. I hold a PhD in Planning and I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning at Kansas State University where I serve as the program Director for our online graduate certificate in and Master of Science in Community Development (M.S. CD). I also serve as Faculty Coordinator for the Great Plains IDEA Community Development online graduate program consortium, which our Community Development academic program is part. In addition to serving on the CDS Board of Directors I am also a U.S. country correspondent for the International Association of Community Development (IACD) and serving as guest editor for the March 2019 edition of Practice Insights, a special edition of the magazine focused on CD education. As a CDS board member, I am interested in the society’s foci and relationships related to the practice of community development, as a professional field and academic discipline.

I have a passion for helping create sustainable, resilient, and livable communities; I have worked domestically and internationally helping promote downtown viability, economic development, environmental conservation, ecological consciousness, social equity, land-use compatibility, housing options, public school quality, and neighborhood amenities.

As an academic I regularly speak at local, regional, national, and international events and I have published my work in multiple peer-reviewed outlets, including Community Development, the journal of the CDS. I have been a member of the CDS since 2014 when I attended my first conference in Dubuque that year, and I have attended every annual conference since. Hope to see you at the next one!

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Columbia, MO - CDS 50th Anniversary Conference Location

From Como Ave, Minnesota to CoMo in the heart of Missouri, USA.

By Jane Leonard, CDS 2019 annual conference program chair

I live in St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, a few blocks away from Como Ave, and not too far away from Como Lake, so when I attended the CDS Board Meeting in Columbia, Missouri last month, I was curious about all the references there to “CoMo.” Sometimes I’m a little slow on the “aha”, but once I got it, I was utterly charmed by the term of endearment for the city that we from CDS will all call home next July 14-17, 2019, for the 50th anniversary and homecoming of our association, and our annual international conference.

As the Columbia Visitors Bureau aptly points out, Columbia, MO is “what you unexpect!” And being someone who loves intact, walkable, and diverse downtowns, I was unexpectedly pleased with the great vibe in CoMo, the beautiful campus of Mizzou - the University of Missouri, and the extra friendly people all around.

In July, we’ll be in the Alumni Center on campus for the conference program, with lodging nearby at The Broadway downtown near the north end of campus, and the Hampton Inn & Suites Columbia (near the Tiger Stadium and south end of campus). Shuttles, scooters, bikes, and short walks will get you around (and there’s a parking garage right next to the Alumni Center, too).

I can’t say enough good things about our Local Host Committee of Missourians who have every logistical detail in hand. You will have an extraordinary time! Please make plans to come, and please share your experiences, ideas, and/or research by submitting a presentation proposal to the program committee by November 15! It’s easy and it’s online at Coming Home to Cultivate the Future.   

So whether you are from the Como neighborhood of St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, or Lake Como, Italy, or anywhere in between, plan to head to CoMo this summer, where together “We’re Columbia…What You Unexpect!”

And checkout the Citizen Jane Film Festival at Stephens College – just happening this past weekend in Columbia. For some reason I love that name, too!

http://www.visitcolumbiamo.com/

Maps & Directions

Columbia Accolades

Community Resources

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Grants - October 2018

GRANTS

Updated October 16, 2018

The grants listed below represent a small selection of United States Government grants which may be of interest to the Community Development Society membership. There are many other departments and grant options which can be viewed at www.grants.gov.us. For regular updates, the site offers a notification and saved search options. Please verify the grant details and deadline on the official website.

Grant

Deadline

USDA: Small Business Innovation Research Program Phase I Fiscal Year 2019

October 25

USDA: Farm to School Training and Curricula

November 26

HHS: Rural Residency Planning and Development Program

November 30

USDA: Farm to School Grant

December 4

HHS: Rural Health Network Development Planning Program

December 21

HHS: National Center for Family/Professional Partnerships

January 24, 2019

HHS: Rural Health and Economic Analysis

 

March 25, 2019
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October Data Viz

Understanding Neighborhoods

nextdoor harris infographic final

 

 

infographic generation y new movers coming to a neighborhood near you 1 638

 

FAS infographic Neighborhoods

 

Appfolio infographic LoveThyNeighbor large

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Meet Our Board - Daniela Mattos

Prepared by Daniela Mattos

My name is Daniela Mattos and I currently serve as a CDS Board member. I am also a Professor of Practice and Director of the Rural Economic and Community Vitality Program at the Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. I received my PhD in Community Development from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and my master’s degree in Agricultural Economics from the University of Sao Paulo, Piracicaba. I also hold a bachelor’s degree in Economics from the University of Sao Paulo.

I was born and raised in a small farming community in the southeast part of Brazil. Growing up there gave me the opportunity to experience and value all the nuances of rural life. As a child I enjoyed the freedom, slow-pace, and safety provided by my community. But then came the “progress”! I witnessed the fast transformation of farms primarily dedicated to growing several products for local and regional consumption (rice, beans, corn, coffee, cattle, etc.) to highly specialized, mechanized, and competitive commodity farming, and more recently their turn to the intensive production of sugarcane to feed the large ethanol and sugar plants surrounding my hometown. Being part of this change launched my interest in rural communities and the economic/social challenges and opportunities they face as a consequence of “progress”. Since 2006, my work has focused on developing better strategies to revitalize rural communities and economies and declining cities and towns through more effective decision-making approaches and fostering strategies for improving citizen participation to address local issues.

In 2014, I was hired by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln to teach courses related to Community Economic Development and develop an online certificate in Rural Economic and Community Vitality (pending final approval). I also teach in the Great Plains IDEA- Community Development Masters’ Program. In general my courses provide students with a firm grounding in the reality of the local/regional economy necessary for successful programs in community economic development and for designing effective local and regional policy and programming in economic development.

I joined CDS because I believe it is the best way for me to get involved with the things that I am passionate about and meet other people with the same passion. I enjoy meeting and learning from experts in the field and CDS provides different ways to access and interact with fellow members from all walks of life and places. I am excited to work with all members of CDS to honor the past work of our members and prepare for future challenges and opportunities in the field of community development.

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September Data Viz

Impacts of Literacy and Reading

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