Written by Bonnie Chandler

The Community Development Society is seeking sponsors for the 2020 Annual International Conference. The focus of the 2020 conference is “Global Challenges, Local Resilience”, a theme that will resonate with a number of individuals and organizations involved in community and regional development work across the U.S. and beyond. We welcome your active participation in the CDS conference as a valuable sponsor.

Sponsor levels are described below. If you have an interest in being a conference sponsor or learning more about this opportunity please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Conference Co-Chairs or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., CDS Business Office.

Community Friend

$100 - $499

You'll receive recognition and link on CDS website and acknowledged in pre-general session display and in conference program and promotional emails.
 

Community Builder

$500 - $999

You'll receive recognition and link on CDS website and acknowledged at the general session, on pre-general session display and other conference signage, and in the conference program and promotional emails
 

Community Advocate

$1,000 - $2,499

You'll receive one complimentary conference registration and a 1/4-page add in the conference program, in addition to recognition and a link on CDS website and acknowledged at the general session and opening reception, on pre-general session display and other conference signage, and in the conference program and promotional emails.
 

Community Promoter

$2,500 - $4,999

You'll receive one complimentary conference registration, a 1/2-page add in the conference program and a 5-by-8 foot exhibit space, in addition to recognition and link on CDS website and acknowledged at the general session and opening reception, on pre-general session display and other conference signage, and in the conference program and promotional emails.
 

Community Champion

$5,000 and above

You'll receive two complimentary conference registrations, a full-page add in the conference program and a 5-by-8 foot exhibit space, in addition to recognition and link on CDS website and acknowledged at the general session and opening reception, on pre-general session display and other conference signage, and in the conference program and promotional emails.
 

Sunday, 29 September 2019 21:05

CDS 2020
"Global Challenges, Local Resilience”

DEADLINE EXTENDED THROUGH DEC. 16, 2019

The Community Development Society (CDS) is requesting proposals for presentations and posters from researchers, practitioners, and others involved in community work for the Community Development Society 2020 Annual International Conference, July 12-15, 2020 in Fargo, North Dakota, USA.

The conference will explore how community developers, organizers, and leaders pursue local resilience in light of global challenges, and how local actions contribute to global resilience in the face of climate change, refugee migration, workforce and trade disruption, and other challenges.

Proposals related to the conference theme, “Global Challenges, Local Resilience” are encouraged, but all submissions will be given full consideration. Each 60-minute breakout session will include 1-3 accepted presentations. We will contact you regarding how your proposal might fit into these sessions and the overall conference program.

If you have questions or experience technical difficulties submitting your proposal, please contact KP Williams, CDS Vice Chair of Programs - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 Pre-conference Workshops: On Sunday, July 14, 2019, we will be hosting pre-conference workshops that engage our membership in meaningful, intensive, and interactive sessions to gain new skills related to community development. Each workshop will be scheduled for a half day or a full day (2.5 hours or 5 hours). Pre-conference workshops should be highly engaging and can cover a variety of topics related to the field of Community Development. Submit a proposal for a pre-conference workshop.

Proposal Guidelines

  • The deadline for proposal submissions is December 16, 2019 at 11:59 p.m. EST. No late abstracts will be accepted.

  • You may submit more than one proposal.

  • All accepted presenters must complete their paid conference registration by Friday, June 12, 2020. Please note, presenters do not receive free registration. 

  • If you are not a member of CDS at the time of your conference registration, please register at the non-member level fee (includes a one-year membership to CDS). 

  • The conference agenda will be finalized by July 1, 2020.

Proposal Types

The following types of proposals will be considered:

PRESENTATIONS: (Maximum 750-word abstract, does not include references or title page)

  • Format: we invite proposals that reflect a variety of delivery formats, including but not limited to round tables, panels, fishbowls, storytelling, interactive workshops, and lightning talks. 

  • Research Presentations include, but are not limited to, empirical research, action or participatory research, research panels and theoretical/philosophical perspectives, discussions or debates.

  • Educator/Practitioner Presentations include but are not limited to innovative ideas and practices, programmatic successes and reflections, panels, and topical discussions.

  • Scholarly Practice Presentations include some elements of both the research and educator/practitioner presentations described above.

  • Emerging Practice and Research Presentations include but are not limited to research that is in progress, new community or educational programs, and discussions of thought-provoking research projects or emerging trends in practice. 

POSTERS: (Maximum 500-word abstract, does not include references or title page)

  • Research Posters include, but are not limited to empirical research, action or participatory research, and theoretical/philosophical perspectives.

  • Educator/Practitioner Posters include but are not limited to innovative ideas and practices, programmatic successes and reflections.

  • Scholarly Practice Posters include some elements of both the research and educator/practitioner presentations described above.


Any submissions exceeding specified word count will automatically be rejected.

Proposal Upload Guidelines

All proposals will be peer reviewed. Submit your proposal as a .docx or .pdf file using the guidelines and the link below. While the submission form will ask for name and contact information, please do not include your name or affiliation on the proposal document. Proposals must be blind, and the blind proposal will be sent to 2-3 reviewers. Notification will be sent via email for international proposals by February 3, 2020 and for U.S. proposals by March 2, 2020.

  • Proposals will be submitted via Google Forms. Author/Presenter information will be collected in a form field separate from the proposal file upload.

  • TITLE PAGE: List the title of your abstract; the title should match the title submitted in the Google Form.

    • DO NOT include the name(s) and institutions/organizations of each author or other identifiable information.

    • DO include up to five keywords that describe your abstract.

  • ABSTRACT PAGE: The abstract should accurately communicate how your proposal relates to community development and the conference theme “Global Challenges, Local Resilience.”

    • Abstracts for presentations must be no more than 750 words.

    • Abstracts for posters must be no more than 500 words.

    • Word count does not include references or title page.

Submit a Proposal

Written by Bonnie Chandler
Sunday, 29 September 2019 20:16

Join Us. Where it all started. 1969. Turmoil, seismic change. Response: Community – Development - Society.

Sound familiar?

It’s now 2019 - Back to the future!

The 50th anniversary of the international Community Development Society (CDS) is a golden opportunity to express and explore the extreme relevance and responsibility of the community development field and CDS to be proactive change agents, to help create conditions for and help foster shared and welcoming communities, and to cultivate a future in which community is the pathway through rising chaos and insularity across our world.

It’s a chance for CDS members, and for any and all colleagues, to remember and re-embrace the ideals with which our founders also struggled, to articulate what was happening and what they could do to help amidst the chaotic change of the 1960s. The chaos then compelled them to join forces and form an association of people who believed in the pathway of community to help channel destructive anger into constructive, collaborative, and inclusive citizen-led community-building.

In fact, our founding leaders* made clear that community development is “a radical profession….based on the belief that people can give purposeful direction to their collective future. How this occurs is based on the community, the issues, the current capacity of people and the resource base that is present…Community development is gaining knowledge and empowerment through a process of collaboration and action.” (Practicing Community Development, Donald W. and Doris P. Littrell, University of Missouri Extension, 2006)

The theme for our 50th anniversary program calls upon on our own skills to reflect, collaborate, and then act to plant the seeds for our next 25 years, to cultivate our future, as CDS members, as community development researchers, scholars, practitioners, and, perhaps most importantly as ambassadors of CD in the many communities, organizations, and institutions in which we participate -- in life and in work. “Cultivating the Future” evokes an invitation for and creativity in research, practice, policy, and theory to be shared in 2019 that offer a glimpse of the next 25 years for community development research and practice. We also seek proposals that showcase what we’ve learned in the past 50 years that still inform our work now, and also what’s ahead in the way of tools, insights, processes, challenges and opportunities. For example, 25 years ago, the Internet was barely on the horizon. Now it’s totally changed how we process information, do business, and relate to one another (or not) within communities and across the world.

How do we hold onto our essential and long-standing roots – our guiding principles noted below -- to weather the storms of current day? What, why, and how do we research, teach, guide, and champion positive change for communities -- to embrace diversity, equity, and inclusion as essential, intentional seedlings necessary to be able to nurture and grow to maturity the sustainable community, economic, and environmental vitality we seek for all, amidst the tumults of 21st century geopolitical life?

Much is the same as 50 years ago: waves of radical action and radical grace in the face of community and world-wide disruptions. Much has changed. We are more fragmented even as we are more widely and thinly connected. Community is fragile, beloved, and yearned. How can we help cultivate a future seeking and needing community to thrive?

Jane Leonard, 2019 CDS Conference Program Chair.

*Founding leaders who conceived and birthed the Community Development Society in 1969 included:

  • George S. Abshier / Oklahoma State University
  • Robert C. Anderson / Michigan State University
  • A. E. Benson / University of Missouri
  • Lee J. Cary / University of Missouri
  • Robert C. Child / Southern Illinois University
  • John O. Dunbar / Purdue University
  • Duane L. Gibson / Michigan State University
  • Otto G Hoiberg / University of Nebraska
  • E. Frederick List / University of Missouri
  • Paul A. Lutz / University of Missouri
  • Robert J. McGill / University of Missouri
  • Earl F. Pettyjohn / Federal Extension Office
  • Bryan M. Phifer / University of Missouri
  • C. Brice Ratchford / University of Missouri
  • Daniel J. Schler / University of Colorado
  • William F. Swegle / Kansas State University
  • L. Keith Wilson / University of Utah

Principles of Good Practice

As a part of the CDS beliefs, the organization follows the core Principles of Good Practice:

  • Promote active and representative participation toward enabling all community members
    to meaningfully influence the decisions that affect their lives.
  • Engage community members in learning about and understanding community issues,
    and the economic, social, environmental, political, psychological, and other impacts
    associated with alternative courses of action.
  • Incorporate the diverse interests and cultures of the community in the community
    development process; and disengage from support of any effort that is likely to
    adversely affect the disadvantaged members of a community.
  • Work actively to enhance the leadership capacity of community members, leaders,
    and groups within the community.
  • Be open to using the full range of action strategies to work toward the long-term
    sustainability and well being of the community.
Written by OGO Sense LLC
Friday, 15 March 2019 04:24
Written by OGO Sense LLC
Friday, 15 March 2019 04:23
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